诸葛亮吧 关注:59,901贴子:1,251,367

The Legendary Prime Minister – Zhuge Liang

只看楼主收藏回复

Zhuge Liang was an excellent politician, thinker and strategist in the period of the Three Kingdoms. His hometown was in present Shandong Province. He became parentless when still young. His uncle brought him up and he suffered homeless life because of the chaos caused by war. After his uncle died, he took up a recluse life in present Hubei Province for ten years, but still kept a close watch on the state affairs outside. Finally, Liu Bei, the ruler of the Shu Kingdom entreated him out of the withdrawal. For the rest of his life, he served in the Shu Kingdom as the chief military advisor. 

Since the regime of Cao Cao in the north boasted the strongest force, Zhuge Liang suggested his master to make allies with the equally weak Wu Kingdom against Cao Cao, which helped to form the confrontation of three kingdoms for over thirty years. Shu-Wu alliance once thoroughly defeated the army of Cao Cao, who was driven back and stayed in the north of the Yellow River for a long time. 

Later, a war broke out between the Wu and Shu kingdoms. Liu Bei was badly defeated and died soon. At his death, he entrust to Zhuge linag his child and the country. From then on, Zhuge Liang devoted himself to the cause of the restoration of the Han Empire bequeathed by his master. He resumed the good terms with the Wu Kingdom, put down the revolt on the border area and ordered the northern expeditions against the Wei Kingdom. 

In 234 AD, Zhuge Liang died of life exhaustion on the battlefield of northern expedition. His death marked the downfall of the Shu Kingdom. He once remarked himself as to bend myself to a task and exert the life to the utmost. Even his rivals could not help admiring his great talent and his devotion to the country. Based on his war experience, Zhuge Liang initiated Eight Elements Battle Formation for army deployment and arrangement. Now the site where he once drilled the army still remains in Fengjie County, Chongqing Municipality. And Wuhou Memorial Temple (Temple of Marquis Wu) has been built all over the country in honor of Zhuge Liang.


回复
1楼2007-04-28 21:57
    After Battle at the Red Wall, assists Liu Bei to still Jing Nan. Afterwards Liu Bei entered the Sichuan, Zhuge Liang assumes personal command Jing Zhou荆州. But the Pang Tong accidental death causes Liu Bei to dispatch Zhuge Liang to enter Sichuan, lets Guan Yu be responsible for the Jing Zhou defense. Zhuge Liang in Sichuan Suchuan period, the main dependence the subordinate which brings from Jing Zhou, simultaneously pays attention bosses around the original Liu jade tablet subordinate and the profit state powerful bullies. Gentleman person poor has the talent which regarding the family background, also vigorously promotes, lets each people all display own ability. His law is strict, the award and punishment must believe. 

    公元221年刘备称帝,建立蜀汉,诸葛亮受任丞相、录尚书事。 
    A.D. 221 Liu Bei proclaims oneself emperor, the found Shu Force, Zhuge Liang holds the post of prime minister. 

    223年(章武三年),刘备病笃,临终托孤于诸葛亮。刘禅继位,他以丞相辅政,又领益州牧,封武乡侯。对于诸葛亮何时当政有争议。有人认为刘备一直十分看重诸葛亮,一直委以重任。另外有些人认为直到刘备去世,诸葛亮才实权推行自己的主张。 
    A.D. 223 Liu Bei died of illness, at the point of death front holds orphaned to Zhuge Liang. Liu Shanji the position, he relies on prime minister the auxiliary politics, also leads Yi Zhou Mu益州牧, seals Wu Xiang Hou武乡侯. Is in power when regarding Zhuge Liang has the dispute. Some people thought Liu Bei continuously extremely regards as important Zhuge Liang, continuously entrusts with an important task. Moreover some people thought died until Liu Bei, Zhuge Liang can actual carry out own position. 

    诸葛亮主政后,先重建孙刘联盟,建兴三年(225年)蜀汉南部的南中地区少数民族在孟获率领发动叛乱。诸葛亮即亲率大军,深入不毛,采取参军马谡建议,以攻心为主,打击为首分子,尽量争取当地上层大姓和民众支持,有的被起用为地方长官。一年多后,这些地区的统治得以稳固,为后来的北伐提供了物力和兵力。 
    After the Zhuge Liang director, first contacts the grandson power, reestablishes Sun the Liu alliance, A.D. 225 Shu Force the south national minority leadership starts the rebellion in Meng Huo under. Zhuge Liang leads personally the army, adopts Ma Su the suggestion, the attack main leader, strives for the local upper formation common surname and the populace as far as possible supports, is appointed they for the governor. After more than a year, these local rules change stably, has provided the physical resource and the military strength for the afterwards Northern Expedition. 

    建兴六年(228年)春,诸葛亮率领大军出汉中,开始第一次北伐。参军马谡极受器重,北伐中马谡为先锋,违反节度,为魏将所败,亮流涕处死,并以用人失察自请贬官。 
    A.D. 228 Spring, Zhuge Liang led the army to embark from Hanzhong, started the first Northern Expedition. The senate army horse stands up receives entrusts with heavy responsibility, but in the Northern Expedition Ma Su violated the enormous strategy to be wrong, military officer is defeated by Wei Guo, Zhuge Liang flowed the tear to execute the horse to stand up, and because this matter requested punished oneself. 

    建兴十二年(234年)54岁的诸葛亮于第五次北伐魏国中病故于五丈原,归葬定军山。 
    A.D. 234 ,54 year-old Zhuge Liang on the way dies from illness in fifth Northern Expedition Wei Guo's to "Wu Zhang Yan"五丈原, finally buried in the "Ding Jun Shan"定军山. 


    后人评价 

    陈寿 在《三国志·诸葛亮传》的后面称他“科教严明,赏罚必信,无恶不 惩,无善不显,至于吏不容奸,人怀自厉,道不拾遗,强不侵弱,风 化肃然也” 

    尚驰《诸葛武侯庙碑铭序》所说“至令官书庙食,成不刊之典,一山之内,每有风行草动,状带威神,若岁大旱,邦人祷之,能为云为雨,是谓存与没人皆福利,生死古今一也。死而不朽,反贵于生。”[《唐文粹》] 

    吕温《诸葛武侯庙记》说,诸葛亮“大勋未集,天夺其魄。至诚无忘,炳在日月,烈气不散。长为雷雨。”[《唐文粹》]


    回复
    3楼2007-04-28 21:57
      Zhuge Liang [ 诸葛亮 - 鞠躬尽悴, 死而後已 ] 
      Also know as "Hidden Dragon (伏龙)" or "Sleeping Dragon (卧龙)". One of the most outstanding politician during the RTK era. Kong Ming was visited by the unfortunate Liu Bei (刘备) three times and finally agreed to join him in 207. At that time he already predicted the land will be divided into three parts. One year later Cao Cao (曹操) attacked the South land. Liu Bei was defeated although Kong Ming burned the enemy twice resulting in the loss of Cao Cao's 200,000 soldiers. Then Kong Ming was sent to Wu to make an alliance with Sun Quan (孙权). Later the two forces joined and defeated Cao Cao at Red Cliff (赤壁). After the battle Kong Ming helped his master to take control of Jing State (荆州) and Yi State (益州). After Liu Bei died in 223, Kong Ming had to run the whole kingdom himself. He attacked Wei six times seeking for the restoration of the Han Dynasty. He never accomplish due to the weakness of Shu such as the population and food, but the main reason was the idiotic emperor Liu Chan (刘禅). The really tired Kong Ming fell ill and died during the sixth Northern Campaign. He was 54. The Kingdom of Shu was getting weaker and weaker after his death and eventually taken over by Wei 30 years later.


      回复
      5楼2007-04-28 21:59
        Zhao Yun [ 赵 云 - 一身是胆 ] 
        A general with courage, intelligence, and loyalty. He had served Yuan Shao (袁绍) and Gongsun Zan (公孙瓒) before joining Liu Bei's (刘备) army. Zhao Yun saved his master's son Liu Chan (刘禅) twice. The first was from Cao Cao's (曹操) force. He struck into the enemies alone himself, saved the young child who was only 2, and returned to his master. The other time was from the Wu navy force. Also, he had been a bodyguard of Liu Bei, and Zhuge Liang (诸葛亮) for many times. Liu Bei titled him as one of Shu's Five Tiger Generals. Zhao Yun also fought in Zhuge Liang's first Northern Campaign at the age of 70, cutting down five generals of Wei in a row, father and four sons. Liu Bei complimented him, "Truly, the man is brave all through." 

        Recently a visitor wrote me about Zhao Yun's age and asked me to change the year of his birth because he should not be that old. I am sorry I can't do that, because I did not make the years up. I read through several books before I put down the years. Zhao Yun was said to be a young general when he first appeared in the novel, chapter 7, but the novel NEVER mentions his age until chapter 92, when Deng Zhi (邓芝) says, "For a man of seventy years, you are unique and wonderful...." That year was 227 A.D. That was the ONLY clue in the novel to determine his age. Of course, in every single RTK games made by KOEI, Zhao Yu always gets the most handsome portrait, if not more handsome than Lu Bu (吕布). This makes us think that Zhao Yun should be a young man, but surely he was the second oldest among the Five Tiger Generals. Yes, he was older than Liu Bei (刘备) also. Okay, he was said to be "young" in chapter 7 (193 A.D.), and so he should not be 70 in the year 227, BUT there was no age mentioned in that chapter. Cao Hong (曹洪) was described by Cao Cao (曹操) as "young and impetuous" in chapter 58, and Cao Hong had to be in his 30's or 40's at that time (211 A.D.). There is no proof saying that Zhao Yun is a younger general. I have to stay with the year I already have, because it is from the sources I have.


        回复
        6楼2007-04-28 22:00
          Xu Shu 走马荐诸葛 
          A great friend of Zhuge Liang's (诸葛亮). When Xu Shu was young, he killed a person to revenge his friend. Later his friends rescued him from the prison, and he changed his name to Shan Fu (单福). From that point on he started studying diligently. One of his teachers was Sima Hui (司马徽), who told him to join the Imperial Uncle (皇叔), therefore Xu Shu became Liu Bei's first "official" advisor. After one great victory over Cao Cao's (曹操) right-hand-man Cao Ren (曹仁), Cheng Yu (程昱) wrote a fake letter saying that the mother of Xu Shu will be executed if her son won't come soon, and Xu Shu had to leave Liu Bei and join Cao Cao. Before he left, he introduced the Hidden Dragon (伏龙) and the Blooming Phoenix (凤雏) to Liu Bei and told him their real names. The mother was shocked when she saw her son, after discovering what happened, she taunted at her son and then committed suicide. Xu Shu fell in deep sorrow and swore that he will never introduce a single tactic to Cao Cao. At the Battle of Red Wall (赤壁之战), he discovered the chained ships would lead to a big fire-attack by the allied Liu Bei and Wu, but he didn't tell Cao Cao, and the Cao army was crushed.


          回复
          7楼2007-04-28 22:00
            懵懂中…


            回复
            10楼2007-04-28 22:03
              三顾茅庐<Three Visits to the Thatched Cottage> 


              After they had become sworn brothers at Taoyuan, Liu Bei, Guan Yu and Zhang Fei made concerted efforts to restore the Han Dynasty. But they felt that it would be impossible to do it without the help of a smart adviser. The Liu-Guan-Zhang alliance later won one battle after another thanks to the advice of Xu Shu. But before long, Xu had to surrender to the opposing camp of Cao Cao in order to save the life of his mother who was abducted by the Cao troops. Before he left, Xu Shu recommended Zhuge Liang to the brothers. 

              《三国演义》中的故事。刘备、关羽、张飞自桃园结义后,虽整天东奔西跑,但因缺少谋士,总觉得恢复汉朝天下无望。后来得徐庶帮助,连打胜仗。徐庶为救母无奈去了曹营。临走推荐了诸葛亮。 

              Accompanied by Guan Yu and Zhang Fei, Liu Bei went to Wolonggang in Longzhong in the hope of inviting Zhuge Liang to be their military adviser. But Zhuge's servant said: "The Mentor left in the morning."Liu Bei asked the servant to forward to Zhuge Liang his message that the brothers had come to visit him. After that, Liu rode his horse away, returning home sullenly. A few days later when he learned that Zhuge Liang was at home, Liu Bei went for another visit along with Guan Yu and Zhang Fei. The servant said: "The Mentor is reading books at his thatched cottage." Liu requested to see him. When they learned that the one reading books at the thatched cottage was not Zhuge Liang himself but his brother Zhuge Jun, the Liu-Guan-Zhang brothers left a letter to express their admiration and then braved heavy snows to return home. 

              一日,刘备带关羽、张飞来到隆中卧龙冈,想请诸葛亮出山。小僮说:"先生今早出去了。"刘备让僮子转告先生说他来访,然后拉马闷闷不乐地回去了。又过了数日,刘备控得诸葛亮已回家,便同关、张二次来访。僮子说:"先生正在草堂看书。"刘备求见后得知不是诸葛亮,而是其弟诸葛钧。于是留下一封信,表达敬慕之情。兄弟三人又冒雪回去了。 

              Not long after they returned to their barracks at Xinye, Liu Bei wanted to visit Zhuge Liang's thatched cottage once more. But Guan Yu dissuaded Liu from going by saying that perhaps Zhuge Liang was not as smart as expected and that he was simply dodging the visiting brothers for that. Zhang Fei said: "You don't need to go. I'll tie him up and force him to come and see you instead." Liu Bei lost no time in telling his brothers the story of King Wen bent on visiting one of his subjects called Jiang Ziya. Liu, Guan and Zhang, therefore, paid a third visit to Wolonggang. They had no sooner arrived than the servant said: "The Mentor is sleeping." Liu Bei waited until Zhuge Liang was awake and dressed . Finally, he consented to see the brothers. Liu Bei paid three visits to the thatched cottage without complaint. He finally succeeded in inviting Zhuge Liang to be his military adviser and to help the brothers in their cause. 

              回到新野不久,刘备想再次去请诸葛亮。关羽劝说:"可能诸葛亮没本事,怕见我们。张飞则说:你们别去了,我用绳子捆来。刘备忙讲了当年文王访姜子牙的故事。兄弟三人又第三次来到卧龙冈。他们一到,小僮忙说:"先生在睡觉。"刘备一直等到诸葛亮睡醒后更衣相见。刘备不辞劳苦,三顾顾庐,终于请出诸葛亮出山辅佐,共图大业


              回复
              11楼2007-04-28 22:09
                "Zhuge Liang and Meng Huo" - the origins of underpants 

                Question: 
                Why do we call underpants "head pants"? 

                Answer: 
                There are many stories about the origins of "short pants". One of the most famous ones is the "Meng Huo" version from the Three Kingdoms period. 

                As the story goes, before Zhuge Liang defeated Meng Huo, Meng Huo became afraid of Prime Minister Zhuge. He wanted to unite his tribes so they could stand together and fight. There were many small tribes at the time, and General Meng must offer gifts to each tribe. 

                The ethic groups of southern China liked to wear shorts at the time, whereas the Hans would wear long gowns. General Meng used beautifully-made shorts as a gift to each of the tribal leaders. This was a secret at first, and no one else knew. "Head Person" was the name for tribal chiefs of ethic minority groups. When General Meng united all the tribes, he was naturally given the title of "Head Person". After Prime Minister Zhuge's "Seven defeats of Meng Huo", General Meng's bribery of formal tribal leaders with "short pants" became well known. 

                Since General Meng had the title of "Head Person", people would later call this style of shorts "head pants". As time passed, this story became well known all over China. Whereas the other versions of this story do not have much supporting evidence, at least the "Meng Huo" version has maintained its virility till today.


                回复
                12楼2007-04-28 22:11
                  Zhuge Liang (181-234)
                  (aka Ch'uko Liang, Kong Ming) 

                   


                  --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                  Zhuge Liang's forefathers had been eminent servants of the state, but he was orphaned in youth. His ability and knowledge of statecraft were prominent, but he chose to farm his land in obscurity before Liu Bei won over him. 

                  He helped Liu set up the kingdom of Shu in western China, in rivalry with the kingdoms of Wei and Wu after the disintegration of the Han dynasty. 

                  He served both Liu Bei and his son and heir, Liu Chan, devotedly, and died on campaign trying to reconquer the land then occupied by Wei. 

                  Through such works as the Sanguozhi Yanyi and popular operas, Zhuge Liang has become a legendary figure in Chinese culture.


                  回复
                  13楼2007-04-28 22:19
                    Zhuge Liang 

                    (born AD 181, Yangdu, Shandong province, China — died August 234, Wuzhangyuan, Shaanxi province, China) Celebrated adviser to Liu Bei, founder of the Shu-Han dynasty of the Six Dynasties period. Liu was so impressed with Zhuge that on his deathbed he urged Zhuge to take the throne himself if his own son proved incapable. A genius in mechanics and mathematics, Zhuge is credited with inventing a bow for shooting several arrows at once and with perfecting the Eight Dispositions, a series of military tactics. Supernatural powers were often ascribed to him, and he is a favourite character in Chinese plays and stories, notably Sanguozhi yanyi (Romance of the Three Kingdoms). In 1724 he was made a Confucian saint.


                    回复
                    14楼2007-04-28 22:23
                      The Southern Expedition
                      Main article: Zhuge Liang's Southern Campaign
                      Zhuge Liang felt that in order to march North he would first have to unify Shu completely. If he fought against the North while the Nanman people rebelled, then the Nanman people would march further and perhaps even press into areas surrounding the capital. So rather than embarking on a Northern Campaign, Zhuge Liang led an army to pacify the south first.

                      Ma Su, brother of Ma Liang, proposed the plan that Zhuge Liang should work toward getting the rebels to join him rather than trying to subdue all of them and he took this plan. Zhuge Liang defeated the rebel leader, Meng Huo, seven different times, but released him each time, in order to achieve his genuine surrender.

                      Finally, Meng Huo agreed to join Zhuge Liang in a genuine acquiescence, and thus Zhuge Liang appointed Meng Huo governor of the region, so he could govern it as he already had, keeping the populace content, and keeping Southern Shu border secure to allow for the future Northern Expeditions. Zhuge Liang obtained resources from the South, and after this, Zhuge Liang made his moves North.


                      回复
                      17楼2007-04-28 22:25
                        Suppressing the rebellion
                        In spring 225, after reallying Shu Han with Eastern Wu, Zhuge Liang personally led the Shu generals south from Chengdu to suppress the rebellion with full preparations. Wang Lian (王连) advised against Zhuge Liang to go personally, but Zhuge Liang was worried that the generals could not deal with the rebels appropriately by themselves. Ma Su suggested to Zhuge Liang that the campaign should focus on psychological warfare rather than conventional warfare in order to ensure that the defeated rebels would not rebel again, a suggestion which Zhuge Liang readily accepted.

                        Zhuge Liang's armies entered Nanzhong via Yuesui (越巂). Along the way, Yong Kai was murdered by one of Gao Ding's subordinates, and Gao Ding was killed in battle against Zhuge Liang's main army. Meanwhile, Ma Zhong was sent to attack Zangke by marching southeast from Bodao (僰道), and Li Hui to attack Jianning from Pingyi (平夷) by marching southwest. Li Hui's army, however, became surrounded in Kunming by the rebel forces twice his numbers, and didn't know of Zhuge Liang's whereabouts to ask for reinforcements. So he pretended to join the rebels, saying his supplies had ran out and couldn't return back north and had no choice but the rebel. When the Nanman people trusted him and lowered their guards, Li Hui stroke and defeated the encirclement. He then led his men south to Panjiang (盘江), and joined Ma Zhong to the east who defeated Zhu Bao in Qielan (且兰). Finally, the two divergent forces rejoined Zhuge Liang's main army.

                        Meng Huo took in the remnant forces of Yong Kai and continued to resist the Shu forces. Zhuge Liang, knowing Meng Huo was respected by the populace, wanted to capture and subdue him according to Ma Su's war plan. When Meng Huo was captured, Zhuge Liang showed him around the Shu camp, asking how he felt about the Shu army. Meng Huo replied: "Before, we didn't know the conditions of your army, so we were defeated. Now you had so graciously shown me your pavilions, I know your army is only as thus, we can win easily." Zhuge Liang smiled, and released him to fight again. After seven captures and releases, finally Meng Huo said, "You must be the valour of the heavens, the south will not rebel again." Zhuge Liang then marched towards Lake Dian, victorious.


                        回复
                        19楼2007-04-28 22:27
                          Aftermath
                          Once Nanzhong had settled, Zhuge Liang split the four existing commanderies (Yizhou, Yongchang, Zangke, Yuesui) into six commanderies, adding Yunnan and Xinggu (兴古). He left the commanderies to be governed by the locals instead of Han Chinese officials, citing three difficulties if Han officials were installed:

                          If foreigners were installed, then soldiers must be stationed and food must be provided to them. (The Nanzhong terrain is difficult for transporting goods.) 
                          The locals were freshly defeated with their fathers and brothers killed, if foreigners were installed and no soldiers are stationed with them, chaos would follow. (The locals would seek revenge.) 
                          The locals were guilty of their recent crimes and would not trust us to forgive them so easily. (There would be misunderstandings.) 
                          Zhuge Liang then returned north, not stationing any soldiers, only requiring the locals to pay tribute. The tributes from Nanzhong included, but not limited to, gold, silver, oxen, and warhorses, which helped Shu Han prosper, preparing it for Zhuge Liang's upcoming Northern Expeditions.

                          Although rebellions in the south still broke out after the Zhuge Liang's Southern Campaign, they were comparatively minor, and Ma Zhong and Li Hui were quick to suppress them again and again. The Nanzhong region enjoyed relative stability under the reign of Shu Han afterwards, contrasted to the Later Han Dynasty.


                          回复
                          20楼2007-04-28 22:28
                            In Romance of the Three Kingdoms
                            Although historical records seem to show that Zhuge Liang actually did capture and release Meng Huo a total of seven times, the details of each capture were not recorded. Luo Guanzhong, the author of Romance of the Three Kingdoms, fleshed out the stories for each capture, inventing many fictional people such as Meng You, Lady Zhurong, King Mulu, etc. Also Zhao Yun, Wei Yan, and Ma Dai were described to have made great contributions to this campaign in the novel, but historically they were not involved with the campaign at all.


                            回复
                            21楼2007-04-28 22:29
                              First capture
                              In the first encounter between Zhuge Liang and Meng Huo, Zhao Yun led a charge and tore through his forces like a gale, after which Meng Huo himself was captured by Wei Yan. Meng Huo refused to yield to Zhuge Liang, whereupon the strategist released him, giving him another chance to attack.


                              Second capture
                              Meng Huo warily created fortifications along a river for the second battle, daring the Shu forces to cross. Ma Dai cut off the supply routes and killed Jinhuan Sanjie, a Nanman officer protecting the river fortifications. Seeing that Shu-Han was much stronger than the Meng Huo's forces, Nanman officers Ahui Nan and Dong Tu Na betrayed Meng Huo and handed him over to the Shu army. But still, he did not yield.

                              As part of a ploy, Zhuge Liang gave Meng Huo a tour of the Shu encampment before releasing him a second time.


                              Third capture
                              Meng Huo, now overconfident in his newfound knowledge of the enemy camp, sent his brother, Meng You, on a false defection ploy, but it was easily discovered and both brothers were captured.


                              Fourth capture
                              Released yet again and eager for revenge, Meng Huo gathered a force of 100,000 and attacked the Shu camp, whereupon Zhuge Liang evacuated his entire force. Of course, this was all part of Zhuge Liang's plan, and Meng Huo's army fell into numerous pit traps that had been dug within the camp. Meng Huo was captured once again.


                              回复
                              22楼2007-04-28 22:29
                                Fifth capture
                                With caution, and learning from his previous failures, Meng Huo now opted to wait for an attack by the enemy. The plan was to lure the Shu forces into poisonous marshes around the caves of King Duosi, but Zhuge Liang was forewarned of the dangers by Meng Huo's older brother, Meng Jie, and managed to avoid the marshes all together. Once again, Meng Huo was defeated and captured, and King Dousi was killed. In folklore, Zhuge Liang became ill from the marshes but then recovered.


                                Sixth capture
                                After Meng Huo's fifth defeat, his wife, Lady Zhurong, now took to the battlefield, complaining that her husband was incompetent. She captured Ma Zhong and Zhang Yi (张嶷), and Zhuge Liang sent Zhao Yun, Wei Yan, and Ma Dai after her. Eventually Ma Dai unhorsed her and captured her. Zhuge Liang returned her to Meng Huo in exchange for the captured Shu officers. Meng Huo now attempted to gather wild animals such as elephants and tigers from King Mulu to combat the enemy, but they were chased away by Zhuge Liang's fire-breathing contraptions, also known as Juggernauts. King Mulu was killed, and Meng was captured again.

                                However, in all contemporary sources, no woman was said to have fought during the Three Kingdoms period.


                                Seventh capture
                                Finally, Meng Huo enlisted the aid of King Wutugu, whose troops wore armor made of rattan that was said to deflect swords and arrows alike. However, Zhuge Liang conjured a trap in which Wei Yan lured Wutugu into a valley with mines set beneath the ground. King Wutugu's troops took the bait and chased Wei Yan into the valley. When inside the valley, Zhao Yun blocked the escape routes off and the mines were detonated, lightning the inflammable armour and destroying Wutugu and his troops. Although a great victory, Zhuge Liang is said to have wept at the destruction when he viewed the valley. Meng Huo was now captured for the seventh and final time.

                                Meng Huo had to admit defeat at this point and he vowed to surrender and serve Shu from the bottom of his heart. The southern threat was neutralized and the Shu army returned home victorious.


                                回复
                                23楼2007-04-28 22:29
                                  Folklore: The origin of the mantou
                                  A popular story in China tells of the invention of the mantou, a kind of steamed bun, by Zhuge Liang during this campaign. It probably rose from the fact that the name Mantou (馒头 Mántóu) is homonymous to "蛮头" — barbarian's head.

                                  The story tells that, after subduing Meng Huo, Zhuge Liang led the army back to Shu, but met a swift-flowing river which defied all attempts to cross it. Locals informed him that the barbarians would sacrifice 50 men and throw their heads into the river to appease the river spirit and allow them to cross; Zhuge Liang, however, did not want to cause any more bloodshed, and instead ordered buns shaped roughly like human heads — round with a flat base — to be made and then thrown into the river. After a successful crossing he named the buns "barbarian's head", or "蛮头", which evolved into the present day "馒头".


                                  Modern references
                                  The southern campaign has been reenacted in a number of video games, including the Dynasty Warriors series and Sangokushi Koumeiden made by Koei. Both follow the events described in Luo Guanzhong's novel, and the player can defeat Meng Huo up to seven times. A whole chapter (out of 5) is dedicated to this campaign in Sangokushi Koumeiden.


                                  References
                                  Luo Guanzhong, Romance of the Three Kingdoms. 
                                  This article includes translated material from the Chinese Wikipedia article zh:南中之战. Its references include: 
                                  Chang Ju, Huayangguo Zhi 
                                  Chen Shou, Sanguo Zhi. 
                                  Pei Songzhi, Annotations of Sanguo Zhi. 
                                  Sima Guang, Zizhi Tongjian.


                                  回复
                                  24楼2007-04-28 22:30
                                    The Northern Expeditions
                                    Main article: Northern Expeditions
                                    Zhuge Liang persuaded Jiang Wei, a general of Cao Wei, to defect to the Shu Han during his first Northern Expedition. Jiang would become one of the prominent Shu generals, and inheritor of Zhuge Liang's battle strategies. Jiang Wei continued to carry on Zhuge Liang's ideals and fight for Shu Han after Zhuge Liang's death in 234.

                                    In Zhuge Liang's later years, he launched expeditions against Cao Wei five times, but all except one failed, usually because his food supplies ran out, rather than failure on the battlefield. His only permanent gain was the addition of the Wudu and Yinping prefectures as well as relocating Wei citizens to Shu on occasion.

                                    On the fifth expedition, he died of overwork and illness in an army camp in Battle of Wuzhang Plains. (The novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms related a story of Zhuge Liang passing "The 24 Volumes on Military Strategy" (兵法二十四篇) to Jiang Wei at the eve of his death.) At Zhuge's recommendation, Liu Chan commissioned Jiang Wan to succeed him as regent. In the novel, Zhuge Liang attempted to extend his lifespan by twelve years, but failed when the ceremony was disturbed near the end when Wei Yan rushed in, announcing the arrival of the Wei army.


                                    回复
                                    25楼2007-04-28 22:31
                                      Legacy
                                       
                                      A Zhuge Nu.Zhuge Liang's name is synonymous with wisdom in Chinese. He was believed to be the inventor of the mantou, the landmine and a mysterious, efficient automatic transportation device (initially used for grain described as a "wooden ox and floating horse" (木牛流马), which is sometimes identified with the wheelbarrow. Although he is often credited with the invention of the repeating crossbow which is named after him, called Zhuge Nu, i.e. Zhuge Crossbow, this type of semi-automatic crossbow is actually an improved version of a model that first appeared during the Warring States Period (though there is debate whether the original warring states bow was semi-automatic, or rather shot multiple bolts at once). Nevertheless, Zhuge's version could shoot further and faster. He is also credited for constructing the mysterious Stone Sentinel Maze, an array of stone piles that is said to produce supernatural phenomenon, located near Baidicheng. An early type of hot air balloon used for military signalling called the Kongming lantern (孔明灯) is also named after him.

                                      Some books rumored to be written by Zhuge Liang can be found today, for example the Thirty-six Strategies of Zhuge Liang, and Mastering the Art of War are two that are generally available. Supposedly, his mastery of infantry and cavalry formation tactics based upon the Taoist I-Ching were unrivalled.


                                      回复
                                      26楼2007-04-28 22:31
                                        He is also the subject of many Chinese literary works. A poem by Du Fu, one of the most prolific poets from the Tang Dynasty, was written in remembrance of Zhuge Liang and his unwavering dedication to his cause, against overwhelming odds. Some historians believe that Du Fu compared himself with Zhuge Liang in the poem. The full text is:

                                        蜀相 (also 武侯祠 )

                                        丞相祠堂何处寻?
                                        锦官城外柏森森。
                                        映阶碧草自春色,
                                        隔叶黄鸝空好音。
                                        三顾频烦天下计,
                                        两朝开济老臣心。
                                        出师未捷身先死,
                                        长使英雄泪满襟。

                                         Premier of Shu (also Temple of the Marquis of Wu)

                                        Where to seek the temple of the noble Premier?

                                        In the deep pine forests outside the City of Silk:

                                        Where grass-covered steps mirror the colours of spring,

                                        And among the leaves orioles empty songs sing.

                                        Three visits brought him the weight of the world;

                                        Two emperors he served with one heart.

                                        Passing ere his quest was complete,

                                        Tears damp the robes of heroes ever since.
                                         

                                        Bai Chongxi, a military leader of the Republic of China and warlord from Guangxi province, earned the laudatory nickname "Little Zhuge" due to his tactical decisions in the Second Sino-Japanese War during the World War II.


                                        回复
                                        27楼2007-04-28 22:31
                                          Modern references
                                           
                                          Zhuge Liang, as he appears in Dynasty Warriors 5.Zhuge Liang's reputation for being an unparalleled genius is also emphasised in his portrayal in video games. Reflecting his status as the most highly regarded strategist in the novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms, games such as Destiny of an Emperor and Koei's Romance of the Three Kingdoms series place Zhuge Liang's intelligence statistic as the highest of all characters.

                                          Zhuge Liang is the protagonist in the tactical role-playing game Sangokushi Koumeiden, where he can die in the Wuzhang Plains like history dictates or go on to restore the Han Dynasty under Emperor Xian.

                                          In the Dynasty Warriors series, Zhuge is also portrayed as a brilliant tactician, and is credited with conceiving and bringing about the birth of the Three Kingdoms. He is wise, calm and loyal to a fault, dedicating his life to Liu Bei's dream even after death. Throughout the game, many of the other strategists depicted, such as Zhou Yu and Pang Tong, are portrayed as being jealous of, or having a strong rivallry with, Zhuge. This is especially true of Sima Yi, who admires but also despises Zhuge Liang passionately. The two often come into conflict, attempting to outwit each other on many occasions, with both succeeding and failing as often as the other.

                                          Zhuge Liang usually does not enter combat during gameplay, but instead takes position at the rear and guides the player's hand. Successfully accomplishing a task or plot that Zhuge has set into motion will usually lead to a quick and effortless victory over the enemy, but failure will result in the plan back-firing, which will usually cause the retreat or death of many fellow officers, making battle exceptionally difficult.

                                          Zhuge Liang eventually dies of illness at the "Battle of Wuzhang Plains," much to Sima Yi's delight. His forces charge, and following Zhuge's final tactical suggestions determine how difficult the battle will become.


                                          回复
                                          28楼2007-04-28 22:32
                                            Northern Expeditions 



                                            Northern Expeditions 
                                            Part of the wars of the Three Kingdoms 
                                            Date Spring 228 - August 234 
                                            Location Gansu and Shaanxi, China 
                                            Result Wei strategical victory, Shu tactical victory, overall expedition failure 
                                             
                                            Combatants 
                                            Shu Han
                                            Qiang Cao Wei 
                                            Commanders 
                                            Zhuge Liang† Cao Zhen
                                            Sima Yi 
                                            For Chiang Kai-shek's Northern Expedition in modern China, see Northern Expedition. 
                                            Wars of the Three Kingdoms 
                                            Yellow Turban Rebellion – Campaign against Dong Zhuo – Jieqiao – Wancheng – Xiapi – Yijing – Guandu – Bowang – Changban – Red Cliffs – Tong Pass – Hefei – Mount Dingjun – Fancheng – Xiaoting – Southern Campaign – Northern Expeditions (Jieting) – Shiting – (Wuzhang Plains) 
                                            The Northern Expeditions (北伐) were a series of five military campaigns launched by the state of Shu against the northern state of Wei from A.D. 228 to 234. All five expeditions were led by the famed statesman and commander Zhuge Liang (诸葛亮). Although they proved unsuccessful and indecisive, the expeditions have become some of the most famous conflicts of the Three Kingdoms period. In popular history, they overlap with the "six campaigns from Mount Qi" (六出祁山).


                                            回复
                                            29楼2007-04-28 22:34
                                              Background
                                              In A.D. 227, China was divided into three competing regimes - Wei, Shu and Wu - each with the purpose of reunifying the empire of the fallen Han Dynasty. In the state of Shu, the strategic thinking behind the Northern Expeditions can be traced back as early as 207, when the twenty-seven-year-old Zhuge Liang outlined his Longzhong Plan (隆中对) to his lord Liu Bei. In it, he explained in very general terms the need to gain a viable geographical base, and then went on to detail a two-pronged strike north for mastery of the north. One advance would be from Yi province in the west (roughly modern Sichuan province), north through the Qinling Mountains, debouching into the Wei River valley and achieving a strategic position at the great metropolis Chang'an from which to dominate the great bend of the Yellow River. The second advance would be from Jing province north toward the political centre of Luoyang.

                                              After Liu Bei established himself in Yi province in 215, the essential prerequisites of the plan had been completed. The geopolitical arrangement envisaged by Zhuge Liang proved, however, to be a military unstable one. The alliance with the state of Wu in the east broke down over the issue of the occupation of Jing province. By 223, the province had been lost and Liu Bei, as well as some of his top generals, were dead. Even after Zhuge Liang re-established friendly relations with Wu, his original plan had been markedly altered since only the left prong could be executed.

                                              In Zhuge Liang's much quoted Chu Shi Biao (出师表) of 227, he explains to Liu Bei's son Liu Shan in highly ideological terms the reasoning for his departure from the capital Chengdu: "We should lead the three armies to secure the Central Plain in the north. Contributing my utmost, we shall exterminate the wicked, restore the house of Han and return to the old capital. Such is this subject's duty in repaying the Former Emperor and affirming allegiance to Your Majesty."


                                              回复
                                              30楼2007-04-28 22:35
                                                Geography
                                                Zhuge Liang's plan called for a march north from Hanzhong, the main population centre in northern Yi province. In the third century, the region of Hanzhong was a sparsely populated area surrounded by wild virgin forest. Its importance lay in its strategic placement in a long and fertile plain along the Han River, between two massive mountain ranges, the Qinling in the north and the Micang in the south. It was the major administrative centre of the mountainous frontier district between the rich Red Basin (Sichuan Plain) in the south and the Wei River valley in the north. The area also afforded access to the dry northwest, and the Gansu panhandle.

                                                Geographically, the rugged barrier of the Qinling Mountains provided the greatest obstacle to Chang'an. The mountain range consists of a series of parallel ridges, all running slightly south of east, separated by a maze of ramifying valleys whose canyon walls often rise sheer above the valley streams. As a result of local dislocations from earthquakes, the topographical features are extremely complicated. Access from the south was limited to a few mountain routes called the gallery roads. These crossed major passes and were remarkable for their engineering skill and ingenuity. The oldest of these was to the northwest of Hanzhong, and which crossed the San Pass. The Lianyun "Linked Cloud" Road was constructed there to take carriage traffic under the Qin in the third century BCE. Following the Jialing Valley, the route emerges in the north where the Wei River widens considerably, near the city of Chencang. Another important route was the Baoye route, which transverses the Yegu Pass and ends south of Mei. A few more minor and difficult routes lay to the east, notably the Ziwu, which leads directly to the south of Chang'an.


                                                回复
                                                31楼2007-04-28 22:35
                                                  First expedition
                                                  At Hanzhong, Zhuge Liang held war council on the method of realisation of the tactical objective of capturing Chang'an. He proposed a wide left hook to seize the upper Wei valley as a necessity to the capture of the city itself. The commander Wei Yan, however, objected to the plan and suggested a bold strike through a pass in the Qinling with 10,000 elite troops to take Chang'an by surprise. He was confident that he could hold the city against Wei until the main forces of Zhuge Liang arrived. Wei Yan's plan was rejected by Zhuge as being too ambitious; he preferred a more cautious approach.

                                                  In the spring of 228, two small forces were sent through Ji Gorge, one of which was commanded by the veteran Zhao Yun, as decoys to give the appearance of threatening Mei. The real objective, however, was to seize the Longyou area far west of Chang'an: Tianshui, Anding, Nan'an and most of all Qishan, the defensive bastion that screened the upper Wei valley.

                                                  Cao Rui, the Emperor of Wei, himself moved to Chang'an to oversee the defense. General-in-chief Cao Zhen secured Mei against Zhao Yun whilst a combined cavalry-infantry force of 50,000 under Zhang He were sent west to oppose Zhuge's main army.

                                                  Sima Yi puts down Meng Da's rebellion which was co-ordinated with Zhuge Liang. Meng Da was taken by surprise as he had not expected Sima Yi to attack without seeking court approval.

                                                  At Jieting, the strategic outpost crucial to future Shu supplies, Zhang He found the larger part of the advance guard of Shu under Ma Su entrenched on a nearby mountain top. Because he forfeited access to water supplies, Ma was easily defeated. The minor part of the vanguard stationed on the mountain road broke through Wei ranks and the remnants of Ma Su's force escaped south, only escaping total annihilation due to Zhang He's fear of ambush. Meanwhile Zhao Yun's small intrusion against Mei met with stiff resistance and Zhuge Liang ordered a general withdrawal to Hanzhong at the prospect of an outflanking motion by the Wei army. Following his defeat, Zhuge Liang had Ma Su executed for the tactical blunder at Jieting and then published a memorial to Liu Shan, in which he chastised himself for the failure and requested demotion from Prime Minister to General of the Left.


                                                  回复
                                                  32楼2007-04-28 22:35
                                                    Second expedition
                                                    Not long after the end of the first expedition, Wu inflicted a defeat on Wei at Shiting, in the Hefei battlegrounds. Fearing a breakthrough in the Huai River valley, the Wei court decided to reinforce the east by transferring troops from the west. Sensing an opportunity, Zhuge Liang struck in December 228 through Qinling in the winter of the same year with the aim of capturing Chencang, communication thoroughfare of the Wei River.

                                                    The walled city was held by Hao Zhao with am estimated 1000 or so soldiers who was warned by Cao Zhen after Zhuge Liang's first campaign to make defensive preparations.

                                                    Although hugely outnumbered by the 20,000 or more Shu troops, Hao refused requests to surrender. Soon Zhuge Liang brought to bear an array of siege equipment, including scaling ladders, battering rams and archery towers. Nevertheless, Chencang could not be broken and the Wei soldiers provided stubborn resistance with various incendiary devices.

                                                    After three weeks, Zhang He arrived with relief troops and food supplies. Zhuge, himself short of grain, ordered a retreat to Hanzhong once more. One of Zhang He's subordinates, Wang Shuang decided to pursue through Qinling and was killed by an ambush arranged by Zhuge. This incident, with the victim as one of the champions personally accredited by the Wei emperor, was a shock reminder of the skills of Zhuge Liang as a master of ambuscades.


                                                    回复
                                                    33楼2007-04-28 22:36
                                                      Third expedition
                                                      The spring of 229 saw Zhuge Liang make his third expedition, the objective being still the Longyou region - with the immediate goal being the capture of the territories of Wudu and Yinping. These areas, on the western foothills of Qinling were swiftly occupied and they would presumably be used as a launch pad for a further strike toward the Wei River. Zhang He, stationed at Tianshui, ordered Guo Huai south to counter the Shu army.

                                                      With timely intelligence, Zhuge Liang immediately reinforced his vanguard by sending his general Chen Shi to defeat Guo's forces in open battle northwest of Wudu, at Jianwei, and taking the two commanderies. Although Guo Huai was defeated he retreated and prepared a defensive position and effectively checked any plans Zhuge Liang had of a quick advance to Tianshui, due to his numerical superiority over both Chen Shi and Zhuge Liang. Zhuge Liang, in the mean time, was leading a separate army to prevent any Wei reinforcement to Guo Huai, and thus could not exploit the advantage achieved by Chen Shi's victory. Frustrated that the tactical victory at Jianwei did not reap significant strategic benefits, and fearing that a stalemate against a well-defended enemy would be a drain on manpower and rations, Zhuge Liang retreated back to Hanzhong. The two commanderies were incoporated into Shu. In response to this the Shu Emperor issued an imperial edict and had Zhuge Liang reinstated as Prime Minister.

                                                      Beginning in the winter of 229 and into the spring of 230, Hanzhong was the scene of a new military development. On knowledge of a Wei offensive, Zhuge Liang initiated extensive defensive preparations including two defensive barriers on the Hanzhong plain, running 200 kilometres with nearly 100,000 troops. The Wei court had decided to abandon its defensive strategy and launched a three-pronged attack with the objective of Hanzhong led by Sima Yi, Cao Zhen and Zhang He. In the fall of 230, when the Wei offensive began with over 400,000 troops, Wei Yan and Wu Yi were sent north with a mixed cavalry-infantry force behind enemy lines to incite dissension amongst the various non-Han peoples, while at the same time sell the famous Chengdu silk brocades in return for horses and weapons. From the start the Wei attack ran into problems: heavy rain continued for more than 30 days, and ensured that the narrow valleys were impassable, while Zhang He in the west had to deal with the threat from the rear. After a month or a half of little progess, the disastrous campaign was terminated. Zhuge Liang made a daring march northwest to relieve Wei Yan, who was besieged by Guo Huai on his return, but before the reinforcement reached its destination, Wei Yan had already managed to defeat the main force of the enemy led by Guo Huai and the Wei reinforcement led by Cao Zhen, and the Shu Han force behind the enemy line was able to safely make a prudence dictated return to Hanzhong.

                                                      In many Chinese historical writings and novels, these campaigns are classified as separate expeditions although the latter two were actually defensive maneuvers and Zhuge Liang never left Shu.


                                                      回复
                                                      34楼2007-04-28 22:36
                                                        Fourth expedition
                                                        Zhuge Liang's fourth Northern Expedition was launched in early 231. Envoys were sent out to rouse the Xianbei and Qiang, urging them to create a disturbance in the Wei rear. Furthermore, supply was improved with the introduction of the 'wooden ox'. Nevertheless, the goal of seizing Longyou was perhaps overly optimistic since Wei's defensive posture in the region was indeed formidable. Qishan was garrisoned, forming an initial defense for Tianshui, which was itself occupied by the battle-tested forces of Guo Huai and Dai Ling. The Shu offensive began with a minor clash at Qishan which the commander-in-chief Cao Zhen feared was a diversion to mask a major offensive through the Qinling passes against Chang'an itself. In the early summer Cao Zhen took ill and was replaced by Sima Yi, who at once set out with the main army at Chang'an to relieve Qishan. On hearing of Sima's advance, Zhuge left part of his 30,000-man army besieging Qishan and set out with the remainder to seize the various Wei garrisons dispersed around Tianshui.

                                                        Without the benefit of coordinated strategic control, his opponents played into his hands. Guo Huai had been ordered to join Sima Yi at Qishan but he took the initiative and together with Fei Yao, garrison commander of Shanggui, tried to catch Zhuge Liang in a front-rear pincer attack. Having left the defensive position, they were routed by the Shu forces, leaving the approaches to Longyou open. Zhuge, however, did not move to take Tianshui, perhaps fearing the breakdown of the supply line should the Shu army overextend itself. Instead he went about harvesting the early spring wheat that was available in the vicinity. Sima Yi, after surveying the situation at Qishan and Gou Huai's defeat, occupied the hills east of Shanggui, blocking any further Shu advance. Upon completing the harvest the Shu forces marched south and halted, preparing for battle; but Sima Yi declined the challenge. Faced with intensive criticism and ridicule, he relented and the ensuing frontal assault by the Wei forces was ruinously defeated. The Wei forces were forced to retreat in disorder and accounts of the battle note that the Shu forces captured 3000 sets of armour, 5000 swords, and 3100 crossbows.

                                                        After such a victory, Zhuge Liang, did not capitalise on it with a major offensive due to the lack of food supply. Instead the Wei-Shu armies settled down to a stalemate at Shanggui of which the resource-poor Shu would surely be the loser. At this juncture, Li Yan, who was responsible for maintaining ration supplies to the front, realising rain had caused the breakdown of transport, informed Zhuge that Liu Shan had ordered a withdrawal. There was, however, some consolation in the retreat. Sima Yi, letting go of his usual cautiousness, ordered Zhang He's cavalry to pursue. At Mumen, Zhang was ambushed by massed crossbowmen as his army entered a narrow defile and killed.


                                                        回复
                                                        35楼2007-04-28 22:36
                                                          Fifth expedition
                                                          See also: Battle of Wuzhang Plains 
                                                          In the following two years both sides developed agriculture and prepared for another inevitable campaign in Longyou. Sima Yi, for his part rehabilitated the Zhengguo Canal of 234 BC, increasing the potential to withstand a protracted war in Longyou.

                                                          In the spring of 234, 100,000 Shu soldiers advanced through Qinling by way of Baoye toward the broad plain of Wuzhang, in what would become Zhuge Liang's fifth and last Northern Expedition. Sima Yi, well prepared for such a move with a 200,000-strong army, built a fortified position on the southern bank of the Wei River. The veteran of the Zhuge Liang's incursions, Guo Huai suggested that the Shu forces were not planning an immediate attack on Chang'an itself but were planning to consolidate their position on the Wuzhang Plain for a takeover of Longyou, which had always been Zhuge Liang's immediate goal. Already, he pointed out, there were reports of Shu forces crossing the Wei River upstream and constructing lines of communications. Concerned about the threat of being cut off on the south bank, Sima asked for an additional planned reinforcement of several hundred thousand troops for the communication centre of Beiyuan. Such a move was none too soon, for Zhuge was already on the verge of wiping out the Wei garrison after encroaching on the Wei positions in the north. After two months of manoevring north of the Wei River, the additional Wei reinforcement successfully foiled Zhuge Liang's attempt and he settled down to a stalemate on the Wuzhang Plain. The Shu army anticipated a long protracted struggle and used the tuntian system pioneered by Cao Cao, as they awaited an agreed offensive by Wu.

                                                          Sun Quan's armies in the Huai region, however, was defeated and his offensive broke down due to the spread of endemic disease. The frustration of this last hope to break the stalemate no doubt increased the rapid deterioration of Zhuge Liang's health and depressed mental condition. By late summer, he started giving instructions to his close subordinate officers on the future of Shu. In the early autumn of 234, Zhuge Liang died at the age of 54.

                                                          Sima Yi, convinced that Zhuge Liang had died despite the fact that Zhuge Liang's death was kept a secret by Shu, gave chase to the retreating Shu forces. Zhuge Liang's successor, Yang Yi then turned around, pretending to strike in full scale by devasting the vanguard of Wei. Learning the news of the defeat, Sima Yi feared that Zhuge Liang only pretended he was dead to lure him out for a full scale war that favored Shu force, and immediately ordered a general retreat. Common folklore tells of a double, or a wooden statue, that was dressed as Zhuge Liang, driving Simi Yi away in this incident. In any case, word that Sima Yi fled from the already dead Zhuge Liang spread, spawning a popular saying, "A dead Zhuge scares away a living Zhongda" (死诸葛吓走活仲达), referring to Sima Yi's courtesy name. Sima Yi's answered such ridicule by claiming that he, like most at the time, could not even predict Zhuge Liang's intention when he was alive, and thus could not do so when Zhuge Liang was dead either.

                                                          News of Zhuge Liang's death was withheld until the army had reached the safety of the Baoye valley to return to Hanzhong. Sima Yi, still fearful that the announcement was false and merely another opportunity for Zhuge to demonstrate his talent for ambuscade, hesitated to pursue. Only after his inspection of the empty Shu encampment did he resolve that pursuit was appropriate, but after reaching Baoye and deciding the advance could not be supported with supplies, the Wei army returned to the Wei River. The death of Zhuge Liang ended a huge strategic threat to Wei and the Wei court soon began development of ambitious public works.


                                                          回复
                                                          36楼2007-04-28 22:37
                                                            Analysis
                                                            It is surprising that though the state of Shu was the weakest in terms of land size and resources, of the three, in its early years it carried out a vigorous offensive military policy. If Zhuge Liang had not have died in 234, he may well have continued this policy. However, the constant expeditions took a heavy toll on Shu's limited resources and this was worsened by Jiang Wei's expeditions after the death of Zhuge Liang. Resources wise, Shu was far inferior to the vast kingdom of Wei, as reflected in the obvious numerical difference: with the exception of the second expedition, Shu force committeed never exceeded 25% of the Wei force it faced during each campaign, and in fact, Shu force could not even achieve numerical superiority locally and it was only Zhuge Liang's ingenuity that forced Wei to be on the defensive all the time.

                                                            Sima Yi was unarguably the best tactician that Wei had at that period. Even so, after initial defeats against Zhuge Liang, he was forced to change his tactics in the later expeditions. He was on the defensive for long periods of time with strong fortifications to deter Shu. His aim was to create a dreadlock in which was to wait for Shu's supplies to run out and to force them to retreat without a fight. In the last expedition's dreadlock on the Wuzhang Plains, Sima Yi's reluctance to engage in battle prompted Zhuge Liang to send him a woman's dress in one occasion to mock his tactics. Even so, Sima Yi refused to bite the bait, much to the displeasure of his officers.

                                                            The diplomatic success in restoring the alliance with Sun Quan prior to the Northern Expeditions has been dismissed as useless because it brought little strategic dividend: each side had different political agendas which precluded close military coordination. Once the first Northern Expedition was turned back, the Wei state was capable of handling the two-front threat without much difficulty.

                                                            Some people believe that Wei Yan's plan for a surprise assault on Chang'an could have succeeded, but it is more likely Zhuge Liang was correct in deciding the plan was far too ambitious. Chang'an, being one of Wei's most prosperous cities, would probably have been well fortified. Furthermore, there is little chance that the people of the city, who enjoyed peace and prosperity under the rule of Wei, would side with the Shu-Han forces.


                                                            References
                                                            Chen Shou "Sanguo Zhi" [1]


                                                            回复
                                                            37楼2007-04-28 22:38
                                                              http://www.answers.com/topic/zhuge-liang


                                                              回复
                                                              38楼2007-04-28 22:38
                                                                怎生一个强字了得~~~


                                                                回复
                                                                39楼2007-04-28 22:44
                                                                  对我考托福有望了


                                                                  回复
                                                                  40楼2007-09-16 13:57
                                                                    晕死了,好端端的写什么英文啊,全看不懂,欺负我英语差么~~~~~~~~~`


                                                                    回复
                                                                    41楼2007-09-16 17:19
                                                                        


                                                                      回复
                                                                      42楼2007-10-22 16:33
                                                                        Cao Cao 是这么翻译的么?


                                                                        回复
                                                                        43楼2010-06-21 13:28
                                                                          求翻译。。。


                                                                          回复
                                                                          44楼2010-06-23 22:25
                                                                            = =~同求翻译。。。


                                                                            回复
                                                                            45楼2010-06-24 11:59